Joint Operating Agreements A Practical Guide

Review for the previous edition: «An overview of the Joint Operating Agreement (JOA), which is so important for energy projects around the world.» The third edition highlights the changes that have taken place in the joa world since the second edition and contains three new chapters (with an increased focus on integrated joint venture structures, contracts and loss of shareholdings) and four new annexes (dealing with model IAS, joint study and supply agreements, IAS guarantee and IAS content for unconventional oil developments). The Joint Operating Agreement (JTA) is one of the key contracts in the world of oil projects and is often the starting point for other key agreements in the processing, sale and transportation of natural gas and crude oil. The Association of International Petroleum Negotiators (AIPN) model was first published in 1990 and underwred a series of subsequent revisions. It is now the most widespread (though not always the most popular) joint venture agreement in international conventional oil and gas projects. This fourth edition of the leading work on Joint Undertaking Agreements (JSAs) offers a practical study of the provisions of a typical OJA, with particular emphasis on critical issues of scope, role of the operator, common and exclusive operation, default, transfer and decommissioning. There is also a practical analysis of the key issues that apply to the operation of an JOA and the positions taken in the leading industrial model of contracts. The prospects of the operator and non-exploitation are discussed, as well as the consideration of national and international standards applicable to oil projects. If ever the opening aipn tackles a 5th edition of the JOA, it will be an excellent reference This book offers a pragmatic and detailed examination of the clause of the latest version (2012) of the oja conventional official aisle. Each clause is analysed in detail by referring to: (1) a statement about what the clause says; (2) a summary of the intended meaning of the clause; and (3) comments on how the clause tends to be modified and could be improved in practice. . .

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